10 Reasons to Employ a Musician

Opportunity

Arts subjects don’t always receive the recognition they deserve. We are  constantly hearing about cuts within the arts and, in some cases, they are completely ignored altogether. But it’s not all doom and gloom! Studying music at a university or music college can be a smart move.

Over the past few months, I’ve read some interesting comments on social media sites about the value of employing musicians, specifically music graduates. The general argument revolved around the respective  positive verses negative traits of employing musicians within other professions. However, employing a musician might just be the best decision employers ever make, and here’s why:

1. Musicians are highly disciplined. They have spent years working at their instrument or voice, prioritising practise time (frequently running into hours per day), constantly setting and achieving new goals.

2. Musicians are generally well-organized.  They constantly organize their schedule to include practice time, rehearsal time, networking time and so on, all on a regular basis.

3. Musicians are natural problem solvers. Whether working out technical problems in pieces of music, or finding funding for a project, musicians will work tenaciously to secure their goals.

4. Musicians are analytical individuals. They are thinkers who analyse and conceptualize, forming opinions and digesting information with ease.

5. Musicians are  accustomed to arranging, hosting and performing at public events which makes them confident when it comes to interacting with others.

6. Musicians are generally excellent networkers; this activity is a prerequisite for obtaining regular performance opportunities; recitals, concerts, session work, and even obtaining pupils.

7. Musicians are adept and usually confident at speaking in public; whether introducing concerts or rehearsing large groups of musicians, they are accustomed to audiences.

8. Musicians think outside the box. They are creative in every sense of the word, always seeking new ways of presenting music, projects and ideas.

9. Musicians are generally expressive human beings who posses great communication skills.

10. Musicians are often competitive, highly motivated and driven, giving them an edge.

Those who’ve studied for a music degree could be amongst the most employable and successful of all graduates. So if you are studying music, considering studying music, or have studied music, you may just be on the path to a bright, gilded future, whatever direction that path may take!


My publications:

For much more information about how to practice piano repertoire, take a look at my piano course, Play it again: PIANO (published by Schott Music). Covering a huge array of styles and genres, the course features a large collection of progressive, graded piano repertoire from approximately Grade 1 to advanced diploma level, with copious practice tips for every piece. A convenient and beneficial course for students of any age, with or without a teacher, and it can also be used alongside piano examination syllabuses too.

You can find out more about my other piano publications and compositions here.

 


 

Some thoughts on the Van Cliburn Competition 2013

The Winner of the 2013 Van Cliburn Piano Competition has just been announced and as usual, it seems, there has been much controversy over the decision. I haven’t been following all the various rounds but I have been enjoying the updates on Twitter and the general consensus about winners (who should win or not).

The Van Cliburn Competition was established in 1958 by  Dr. Irl Allison, founder of the National Guild of Piano Teachers, who announced at a banquet (with Van Cliburn present) of his intentions to award $10,000 to the first prize awarded by an international piano competition named in Cliburn’s honour. The first competition was held in 1962 and then every four years thereafter.

Over the past four decades, this contest has involved many world-class pianists and the juries have consisted of very illustrious musicians including: Jorge Bolet, Philippe Entremont, Rudolf Firkusny, Leon Fleisher, Malcolm Frager, Alberto Ginastera, Howard Hanson, Nicole Henriot-Schweitzer, Lili Kraus, Alicia de Larrocha, Dame Moura Lympany, Nikita Magaloff, Gerald Moore, John Ogdon, Cecile Ousset, Gyorgy Sandor, Harold Schonberg, Maxim Shostakovich, Soulima Stravinsky, Walter Susskind, Alexis Weissenberg, and Earl Wild. Among the conductors who have shared the stage with competitors during the final round of the Competition are Leon Fleisher, John Giordano, Milton Katims, Ezra Rachlin, Walter Susskind, Stanislaw Skrowaczewski, and Jerzy Semkow.

Ralph Votapek (from the USA) was the first winner and subsequent pianists who have won prizes include; Cecile Ousset, Radu Lupu, Cristina Ortiz, Christian Zacharias, Alexander Toradze, Christian Blackshaw,  Ian Hobson, Barry Douglas, Olga Kern, Maxim Philippov, and Sa Chen.

Whether you agree with the whole competition process or not, it’s been fascinating watching the live broadcasts and webcasts which permits the world to examine every detail. I usually ask pianists in my interview Series, Classical Conversations, whether they feel competitions can still establish a pianist’s career. Many of my interview guests have won various prizes or have been on international competition juries, so they all know the pressures and politics which frequently beset these contests. However, they generally agree that they are a useful stepping stone in the learning process for the reason because they encourage young pianists to ingest large amounts of repertoire all at once and are an excellent way of performing to an audience and getting ‘out there’. It’s often been suggested that the ‘safe’ pianist covets the first prize and many of the ‘lesser’ prize winners enjoy rather more successful careers.

This controversial point has been bourne out by so many first prize winners who have miserably failed to establish careers at all. This year’s ‘PianoFest’ has been a feast of superlative playing; most will agree that any of the finalists would have been worthy winners.  Ukrainian Vadym Kholodenko won the Gold Medal, Italian Beatrice Rana won the Silver medal and American  Sean Chen won the Bronze Medal. Beatrice Rana was the clear favourite from the outset and she will no doubt go on to have a fabulous career, as they will all do hopefully. I wish them every success in what has to be the most demanding career on earth.

Here they are in action:



My publications:

For much more information about how to practice piano repertoire, take a look at my piano course, Play it again: PIANO (published by Schott Music). Covering a huge array of styles and genres, the course features a large collection of progressive, graded piano repertoire from approximately Grade 1 to advanced diploma level, with copious practice tips for every piece. A convenient and beneficial course for students of any age, with or without a teacher, and it can also be used alongside piano examination syllabuses too.

You can find out more about my other piano publications and compositions here.