Historic Classes with Arthur Rubinstein

Those who read this blog regularly will know that I enjoy featuring classes given by master teachers. Today’s post highlights a series of historic classes with the legendary Polish born pianist Arthur Rubinstein (1887 – 1982). Considered by many as the greatest interpreter of Chopin, Rubinstein gave these classes in 1978 at the Jerusalem Music…

An Angel’s Footsteps: A Birthday Gift

Today is my birthday, and I want to offer a birthday gift as part of my celebrations, which are certainly low-key this year, as might be expected!  For those who teach the piano, or are just learning to play, I hope this free download will provide useful repertoire material. I wrote An Angel’s Footsteps a…

Studying at a Music Conservatoire: Yuki Negishi

Much has been made about the importance of studying at a music conservatoire, or a specialist music institution. I hear numerous comments – both good and bad – about what I considered a privilege and a wonderful opportunity.  But how does this opportunity impact the life of a musician, and is it a vital part…

The Una Corda: 5 Tips

If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you will know that I write an article for Pianist Magazine’s bimonthly newsletter. This post, known as ‘online content’, always appears in a ‘5 tips’ context, and this month’s tips focuses on the ‘una corda’ or left pedal. I hope it’s of interest. For teachers (or parents)…

The Second Prokofiev Festival: Yulia Chaplina

It’s always a pleasure to highlight special events, and this one is particularly exciting as it’s actually taking place ‘live’. Russian pianist Yulia Chaplina is the Artistic Director of The Second Prokofiev Festival to be held at the end of May in London. In this article, she offers a sneak preview, and reminds us of…

Flipping musical misperceptions on their heads: Erica Sipes

My guest writer today is American pianist, writer and professor Erica Sipes. Erica is the author of the popular blog, Beyond The Notes, which provided the inspiration for my blog when I started almost ten years ago. In this article, Erica writes about an issue which often rears its head for many a musician. Over…

Pianists From The Past: James Booker

My Pianists From The Past series goes from strength to strength; I’m delighted that so many musicians have participated. You can read all the articles in this series on my blog archives page, here. Today’s post features jazz pianist James Booker. This article has been written by British jazz pianist, composer and educator Tim Richards,…

My work as a composer: Wendy Edwards Beardall-Norton

My guest writer today is Canadian composer and teacher Wendy Edwards Beardall-Norton. Wendy has taught the piano for over 40 years and, more recently, she has been writing music for it. In this article she describes her journey towards composition, and how she became a published composer. You can also enjoy her music by hearing…

Julian Lloyd Webber at 70

Today’s guest post has been penned by Julian Lloyd Webber, who turns 70 today. A musician needing no introduction, I am honoured to feature Julian’s work here on my blog. This renowned ‘cellist has also become a beacon for music education, and, as the following article testifies, he has worked, and continues to work, tirelessly…

Practice Tips for Exam Pieces: Christopher Norton

Today’s guest post has been written by renowned composer Christopher Norton. This is the first article in a mini-series on this blog over the next few months, where Chris will take students through his own piano pieces, many of which are currently featured on various exam syllabuses, offering helpful practice tips and suggestions. We begin…