Play it again: PIANO Book 2

Those of you who read this blog regularly will know that I have recently written a new two-book piano course, Play it again: PIANO (Schott). Book 1, released in April 2017, was featured on my blog a few months ago (you can read about it here), but I haven’t really focused on Book 2 as yet (it was published at the end of July). Following on from Book 1, Book 2 is also a progressive, graded course, takeing students from intermediate level up to advanced (approximately Grade 4/5 up to Grade 8 +).

Who is this course for?

Play it again: PIANO is designed for those ‘returning’ to the piano after a break (whether a teenager or adult), it would also be useful for students who want a course running in tandem with the British examination boards (great for repertoire between exams, plus helpful information on piano technique, scales, arpeggios and sight-reading). Teachers who fancy an anthology of pieces to work through with their pupils, may like to explore these books too.

What you can expect to find in the books

The course consists of 49 piano pieces (28 in Book 1, and 21 in Book 2), the majority of which are drawn from standard repertoire (with emphasis on pedagogical works), starting at elementary level (Grade 1) through to advanced (Grade 8). Each book has an extensive ‘technique’ section at the beginning, with plenty of technical reminders and practice recommendations, and a ‘theory’ section at the end. Each piece contains at least two pages of practice ideas and tips, as well as many musical examples, diagrams and photographs. As this is a progressive course, it’s possible to ‘return’ to a level to suit your current standard; some may want to start at the beginning (which is what I suggest, as this can be valuable, even if your playing is at a much higher level), whilst others may prefer to ‘drop in’ at Book 2 or a later stage.

Each book is divided into four parts, and Book 2 looks like this: Late Intermediate, Early Advanced, Advanced, and Late Advanced. Although this course is not exam based, it’s helpful to know the approximate grades for each level; Late Intermediate is roughly Grades 5 – 6 level (ABRSM exam standard), Early Advanced, Grades 6 – 7, Advanced, Grade 7 – 8 and Advanced, Grade 8 and above.

Every level contains a group of pieces; 6 in the Late Intermediate and Early Advanced levels, 5 in the Advanced section, and 4 pieces in the Late Advanced. My brief was to include a wide variety of styles and genres, so there’s plenty for those who enjoy lighter Contemporary styles (rock, ragtime and blues).  There are also plenty of well-known original classical pieces and some lesser known gems too.

Book 2 Repertoire

C.P.E. Bach: Solfegietto C minor H 220
L.v. Beethoven: Für Elise WoO 69
F. Mendelssohn-Bartholdy: Song Without Words, op. 30/3
H. Berens: Study F Major, op. 88/18
E. Cobb: Lavender Haze
M. Spanswick: Seahorse Dream
G.F. Händel: Allegro from Suite G Major HWV 441
W.A. Mozart: Allegro from Sonata C Major KV 545
L.v. Beethoven: Adagio Sostenuto from “Moonlight” Sonata, op. 27/2
J.B. Cramer: Study C Major, op. 50/1
J. Brahms: Waltz A-flat Major, op. 39/15
S. Hormuth: Sweat Feet Stomp
F. Schubert: Impromptu A-flat Major D 935/2
S. Heller: Warrior’s Song, op. 45/15
C. Debussy: The Girl with the Flaxen Hair L 117/8
Trad/B.Carson Turner: Londonderry Air
J. Turina: Fiesta, op. 52/7
J.S. Bach: Prelude and Fugue C minor BWV 847
F. Chopin: Raindrop Prelude, op. 28/15
S. Joplin: The Entertainer
S. Rachmaninoff: Prelude in C-sharp minor, op. 3/2

Layout

I’ve included the scale and arpeggio of each key (where appropriate), and warm-up exercises, tailored to certain pieces. There are a myriad of practice ideas, and different methods of breaking pieces down, re-assembling them with ease and with greater understanding. Each piece contains fingering, dynamic suggestions and (where necessary) some pedalling. Although you may choose to ignore this and add your own. All the information provided for every piece is transferable to an infinite number of piano works, therefore building solid practical methods for tackling different styles and genres.

The pages are well laid out and are designed with ‘Tips’ and ‘technique’ box-outs, and I hope it’s an easy to use course, inspiring pianists to rekindle their love for the piano.

‘Melanie Spanswick’s Play it again: Piano in my view exactly hits the spot for these players, and deserves to be a huge success both for her and Schott Music.

It is abundantly clear that a huge amount of thought, work and expertise has gone into each and every element of these superb books, and it’s all paid off handsomely: Play it again: Piano is simply one of the most brilliantly conceived and stunningly produced sheet music publications of recent years.

I write lots of reviews for the benefit of readers, but this inspiring series has passed the ultimate test: I will certainly be recommending and using these books with lots of my own students in the coming months and years, and I’m really looking forward to it!

Genuinely Brilliant!’

Andrew Eales, Pianodao.com Blog

You can purchase the books on Amazon in the UK, Book 1 and Book 2, from the Schott website, or from many other internet outlets. If you are in the US, you can purchase here: Book 1 and Book 2. Canada: Book 1 and Book 2. Japan: Book 1 and Book 2, as well as many other online sites worldwide.


My publications:

For much more information about how to practice piano repertoire, take a look at my two-book piano course, Play it again: PIANO (Schott). Covering a huge array of styles and genres, 49 progressive pieces from approximately Grade 1 – 8 level are featured, with at least two pages of practice tips for every piece. A convenient and beneficial course for students of any age, with or without a teacher, and it can also be used alongside piano examination syllabuses too.

You can find out more about my other piano publications and compositions here.


 

 

 

 

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Play it again: PIANO Book 1

The piano is an intoxicating instrument. Those who have played in their youth often harbour a desire to return to it later in life. Piano ‘returners’ make up an increasingly large cohort of amateur pianists. Whether younger or older, it’s usually fairly easy to pick up again and  progress can be swift, proffering the opportunity to fall in love with this majestic instrument (and its colossal repertoire) all over again.

My new two book piano course, Play it again: PIANO has been written with the ‘returner’ in mind. Book 1 was published just last month (and Book 2 will be available from the beginning of July). The first book takes pianists almost back to the beginning (but not quite; this isn’t a piano tutor or method book).

The course consists of 49 piano pieces, the majority of which are drawn from standard repertoire (with emphasis on pedagogical works), starting at elementary level (Grade 1) through to advanced (Grade 8). Each book has an extensive ‘technique’ section at the beginning, with plenty of technical reminders and practice recommendations, and a ‘theory’ section at the end. Each piece contains at least two pages of practice ideas and tips, as well as many musical examples, diagrams and photographs. As this is a progressive course, it’s possible to ‘return’ to a level to suit your current standard; some may want to start at the beginning (which is what I suggest, as this can be beneficial, even your playing is at a much higher level), whilst others may prefer to ‘drop in’ at Book 2 or a later stage.

In Book 1, the technique section focuses on flexibility, posture, and keeping relaxed during practice sessions, with a few warm-up exercises, posture suggestions, and scales, arpeggios, and sight-reading practice tips. The theory section offers note reading reminders and exercises, how to keep time, time signatures, and all the information needed to understand the music within the book.

Each book is divided into four parts, and Book 1 looks like this: Elementary, Late Elementary, Early Intermediate and Intermediate. Although this course is not necessarily exam based, it’s helpful to know the approximate grades for each level; Elementary is roughly Grades 1 – 2 level (ABRSM exam standard), Late Elementary, Grades 2 – 3, Early Intermediate, Grade 3 – 4, and Intermediate, Grades 4 – 5.

Each level contains seven pieces (therefore 28 in Book 1); a technical study, an arrangement and a selection of standard repertoire. My brief was to include a wide variety of styles and genres, so there’s plenty for those who enjoy rock, latin, jazz, blues and even a piece for those who want to try their hand at improvisation. I’ve endeavoured to add a number of favourite original works throughout both volumes, and have balanced these with some terrific lesser-known gems.

The Elementary section includes works by Purcell, Petzold, Bertini, Tchaikovsky, Elgar (an arrangement of Salut d’Amour), a latin number by John Kember and Elena Cobb’s improvisation piece, Super Duck. Whilst the Late Elementary portion features Clarke, W.A. Mozart, Schumann, Gurlitt,  a study by Schytte, a Scott Jopin arrangement and a rock piece by Tim Richards. In the Early Intermediate section you can expect to find works by J.S. Bach, Gounod, Chopin, a study by Lemoine, The Sailor’s Hornpipe (an arrangement), a ragtime piece by John Kember, and a blues number by Mike Readdy. And the final collection, Intermediate, offers Clementi, Burgmuller, Satie, a study by Czerny, an arrangement of Mozart’s A Little Night Music, a rock piece by Jurgen Moser and a minimalist inspired Contemporary piece (Karma from Digressions) by myself.

I’ve included the scale and arpeggio of each key (where appropriate), and warm-up exercises, tailored to certain pieces. There are a myriad of practice ideas, and different methods of breaking pieces down, resembling them with ease and with greater understanding. Each piece contains fingering, dynamic suggestions and (where necessary) some pedalling. Although you may choose to ignore this and add your own.

All the information provided for every piece is transferable to an infinite number of piano works, therefore building solid practical methods for tackling different styles and genres.

This book could be used by a plethora of students; adults returning to this pursuit (it could be useful for study on your own or whilst learning with a teacher), teenagers (or anyone of any age!) who fancy a progressive course with a variety of music (it could be used alongside piano exam preparation too), and piano teachers may find it a beneficial selection of repertoire to use with adult students in particular (several piano teaching friends have already started using Book 1 for this purpose).

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The pages are well laid out (see above) and are designed with ‘Tips’ and ‘technique’ box-outs (the books are published by one of the world’s leading music publishing houses, Schott), and I hope it’s an easy to use course, inspiring pianists to rekindle their love for the piano.

You can find out more here, watch my taster videos by clicking on the links below, and order your copy from many outlets worldwide, including:

For those in the UK: Schott Music or Amazon (there are many other online shops also selling the book).

For those in Europe: Schott Music

For those in the US: Amazon

For those in Canada: Amazon

For those in Japan: Amazon





My publications:

For much more information about how to practice piano repertoire, take a look at my two-book piano course, Play it again: PIANO (Schott). Covering a huge array of styles and genres, 49 progressive pieces from approximately Grade 1 – 8 level are featured, with at least two pages of practice tips for every piece. A convenient and beneficial course for students of any age, with or without a teacher, and it can also be used alongside piano examination syllabuses too.

You can find out more about my other piano publications and compositions here.