Teaching Improvisation to Groups by Christopher Norton

My guest writer today is renowned New Zealand born composer and music educator Christopher Norton. Christopher is well-known for his Microjazz series;  a collection of jazz piano books for students of all levels which has sold well over a million copies worldwide. More recently, he has written Micromusicals for schools, and he continues to compose music in many different styles and genres. In the first of a short series of posts for my blog, Christopher sheds some light on teaching improvisation to groups. Over to Christopher…


I’ve just come back from a 2-day Keyboard Kamp (like the spelling? – I’m in North America now!) with young students from all over Canada. My brief was to teach improvisation in groups, ranging in age from around 7 years old to teenagers as old as 16. I had to decide in advance which material to use and how to use it, all without any music in front of the students (who were also sharing keyboards!) That was my choice – I have learnt that relying on students reading music can prove awkward, because in most groups music-reading ability is variable, to say the least.

I used 2 main series, Connections for Piano and American Popular Piano and used a variety of approaches. The first piece was from Connections 3 – Samba Sand. The tune employs the same three chords, three times:

Connections for Piano has backing tracks and I use these all the time when doing improv. But the first thing I did was teach 3 chord shapes, played with right hand initially, but not too low or too high on the keyboard. The chords were:

I taught each chord, one at a time, by saying the names of the notes from the bottom note – “B, D, G” was the first chord. Once everyone could play the chord comfortably, I named it “chord 1” and proceeded to spell out the next chord – “C, E, G” (‘chord 2’) The group seemed relieved to find they were playing a chord of C major!) Finally chord 3 – A, D, F#. I did quiz the group about what they thought the chords might be, then explained very quickly about the broad concept of inversions. If you haven’t noticed already, there is a first inversion of G, a root position C and a second inversion of D.

Now, with a backing track (available with all Connections for Piano pieces) I got them to play the chords, with me shouting out helpfully, in advance, what the next chord was going to be. This was taxing enough for the students, especially when the 8th bar of each phrase was a specific rhythm on chord 1:

Once the students have the chords feeling semi-automatic (with the track) they can start the improvisational aspect – chord rhythms. I suggest some repeated rhythm patterns, like:

Trying different rhythm patterns over a specific chord pattern is sufficiently taxing for a group, while still being fun.

The next thing to try is a left hand bass line, using the original piece as a template (for the teacher – the students still do it by ear). So I say, “when I say G you play this pattern”:

They learn that, then I say “if that is G, what is C?”. They hopefully find C, E, G. Then D, which has an F# (D, F#, A) Then through the chord sequence, with the track, with me shouting “G!”, “C!” etc. just before they are due to play the chord.  The whole sequence:

G / / / |C / / / | G / / / |D / / / |

G / / / |C / / / | G / D / |

(And repeat x2)

The next step is to play the 3-note chords in the right hand and the bass line in the left hand, with a variety of rhythm patterns in the right hand, including off-beat crotchets and even off-beat quavers! Reggae and ska sorted.

The next article will talk about right hand improvisation. But chord rhythms and a bass line, and using chord numbers as well as names, is a great start!

The Connections for Piano series, with tracks, are available from www.80dayspublishing.com.


My Publications:

For much more information about how to practice piano repertoire, take a look at my two-book piano course, Play it again: PIANO (Schott). Covering a huge array of styles and genres, 49 progressive pieces from approximately Grade 1 – 8 level are featured, with at least two pages of practice tips for every piece. A convenient and beneficial course for students of any age, with or without a teacher, and it can also be used alongside piano examination syllabuses too.

You can find out more about my other piano publications and compositions here.


 

Introducing Duo Feola

For those keen on the piano duo repertoire (both duet and two-piano) – and it’s hard not to be! – these forthcoming concerts are sure to be a pre-Christmas highlight. Contemporary works and lesser known gems sit alongside traditional favourites, and all three concerts feature Italian pianists, Duo Feola. The programmes include works by C. Debussy, R. Hahn, P. A. Grainger, A. Casella, I. Stravinsky, L. Durey and C. Norton.

The concert at Stowe School on December 13th 2017 (in Buckinghamshire) will be a two-piano concert, whereas those at the Christian Science Church on December 14th (in York, North of the UK), and at Peregrine’s Pianos on December 15th (in London), will focus on piano duet repertoire.

Duo Feola are a piano duo from Bergamo.  Sisters Nicoletta and Angela Feola, have been performing together since they were small, and studied at Conservatorio “Giuseppe Verdi” in Milan, continuing their studies at Salzburg’s Mozarteum with Alfons Kontarsky and at Trinity College, London, completing a Masters in Advanced Recital Piano Duet.

They have played for concerts and festivals all over Europe, and have recently recorded a CD featuring the music of Hindemith for the label Art Voice. They have also been featured on radio and television broadcasts in Italy, Germany and Poland.

Duo Feola’s  repertoire is large, ranging from Bach to contemporary music. A number of composers – Matteo Segafreddo, Irlando Danieli, Angelo Paccagnini and Goffredo Haus have written music dedicated to them. Most recently, Christopher Norton, the renowned composer of Microjazz, has written an Italian Suite for 2 Pianos for Duo Feola and it will receive its UK premiere, along with a new Anatolian-Portuguese Suite for 2 Pianos, also written by Norton (both published by 80dayspublishing, Christopher’s own publishing company). The composer will also play (at all three concerts) some of his more popular works, particularly those on examination board syllabuses.

You can reserve your tickets on eventbrite: December 13th at Stowe SchoolDecember 14th at the Christian Science Society, or December 15th at Peregrine’s Pianos, or alternatively buy them at the door.

Hope to see you there!


 

 


My publications:

For much more information about how to practice piano repertoire, take a look at my two-book piano course, Play it again: PIANO (Schott). Covering a huge array of styles and genres, 49 progressive pieces from approximately Grade 1 – 8 level are featured, with at least two pages of practice tips for every piece. A convenient and beneficial course for students of any age, with or without a teacher, and it can also be used alongside piano examination syllabuses too.

You can find out more about my other piano publications and compositions here.