Studying at a Japanese Music Conservatoire: Yuki Negishi

Today’s article has been written by Japanese pianist Yuki Negishi. Following on from her very popular first post, in this second instalment, Yuki continues her piano journey, offering her thoughts and experiences on studying at the renowned Toho Gakuen School of Music in Tokyo, Japan. You can read the first post in this series, which…

Exploring the Sostenuto Pedal

My bi-monthly article for Pianist Magazine’s newsletter is always a ‘5-tips’ affair. This month’s focuses on the oft-forgotten Sosenuto pedal, or the ‘middle’ pedal, on grand pianos. I hope you find it of interest. As a teacher, if you mention the Sostenuto pedal you tend to get a perplexed or puzzled look from a student….

The Key to Scales and Arpeggios: The Winners

Many thanks to all those who took part in my weekend competition. The prize is one of two copies of The Key to Scales and Arpeggios by Jane Mann. The winners are: Hiroko Yamamoto and Diana Pinchin CONGRATULATIONS! Please send your full name and address via the contact page on this blog and your book…

The Key to Scales and Arpeggios: Weekend Competition

Today’s guest post has been written by Jane Mann. Jane is a piano teacher and writer, and, in this article, she highlights her scale book series (published by Alfred Music UK), telling the story behind its conception. We are also running a weekend competition, too, and therefore, for your chance to win one of two…

Beginning Jazz Piano: Tim Richards

My guest writer today is renowned British jazz pianist, author, and educator Tim Richards. Tim has written numerous best-selling books and is a Schott Music author and composer. In this article, he offers an introduction to his latest series, Beginning Jazz Piano – A Introduction to Swing, Blues, Latin & Funk. Part 1 is the…

Lost in Thought: Practice Tips

The following post was written for Schott’s magazine üben e musizieren, and it’s been published in the most recent edition. The article is a veritable ‘How-To-Play’ of my little piece Lost in Thought, which is the first piece in a collection entitled No Words Necessary. Here, I’ve printed the English version below, but you can…

Historic Classes with Arthur Rubinstein

Those who read this blog regularly will know that I enjoy featuring classes given by master teachers. Today’s post highlights a series of historic classes with the legendary Polish born pianist Arthur Rubinstein (1887 – 1982). Considered by many as the greatest interpreter of Chopin, Rubinstein gave these classes in 1978 at the Jerusalem Music…

An Angel’s Footsteps: A Birthday Gift

Today is my birthday, and I want to offer a birthday gift as part of my celebrations, which are certainly low-key this year, as might be expected!  For those who teach the piano, or are just learning to play, I hope this free download will provide useful repertoire material. I wrote An Angel’s Footsteps a…

Studying at a Music Conservatoire: Yuki Negishi

Much has been made about the importance of studying at a music conservatoire, or a specialist music institution. I hear numerous comments – both good and bad – about what I considered a privilege and a wonderful opportunity.  But how does this opportunity impact the life of a musician, and is it a vital part…

The Una Corda: 5 Tips

If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you will know that I write an article for Pianist Magazine’s bimonthly newsletter. This post, known as ‘online content’, always appears in a ‘5 tips’ context, and this month’s tips focuses on the ‘una corda’ or left pedal. I hope it’s of interest. For teachers (or parents)…